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Messages - Monday_friday2020

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WORLD EVENTS / For Many, George Floyd Death Not a Solitary Incident
« on: July 09, 2020, 02:41:07 AM »
WASHINGTON - Gerald Davis, a 67-year-old small business owner in Washington, D. C. , was driving to buy insect repellent at a local 7-11 convenience store Friday night when a van began tailgating him with its high beams on.

“I gave them the courtesy of going by me by pulling over, they stayed behind my truck and it really frightened me. . . it was clear that this was a harassment situation,” Davis said.

“And what just happened in Minnesota - that’s running across my head. ”

Davis saw a police car outside the 7-11 and pulled over - both to buy his bug spray and to speak with the officers about what he had experienced.

“They were so dismissing.  They were not even interested in what I was saying,” Davis recounts.

What happened in that moment mirrors what a multitude of black Americans and supporters are are feeling throughout the country today.

“I remembered at 4 years old when I couldn't sit at a soda fountain in my hometown.

That came up.  Going to the all-white high school, being one of 12 black kids - the harassment and threats out there.  That exploded.  The many times I've been stopped by the cops harassing me,” Davis said.

“All that erupted in my gut . . .  I turned to the cops.  I had no fear.  And I just said, ‘a black man's feelings are never regarded because white people have been trained, particularly police, to dehumanize them. ”

For many who are defying a COVID-19 pandemic to protest around the United States today, the violent death of George Floyd -- who died with a Minneapolis police officer pressing his knee on his neck -- is not a solitary incident, but a tipping point.

In an op-ed for the Los Angeles Times, renowned basketball player Kareem Abdul-Jabbar writes, “African Americans have been living in a burning building for many years, choking on the smoke as the flames burn closer and closer. ”

“Right now it’s George, Breonna, and Ahmaud.  Before that it was Eric, Sandra, and Michael.  It just goes on, and on, and on,” former first lady Michelle Obama wrote on Twitter.


“George Floyd was killed like an animal.  And we're tired.  This is the norm.  This is not something that's new,” demonstrator Diedre O'Brien told VOA at a protest outside the White House this weekend.

Many protesters are worried about the virus - and some note the preliminary data showing black Americans are dying of COVID-19 at a higher rate than their white counterparts.

“I wear my mask, trying to keep a safe distance from a bunch of different people.  And I'm also a black woman who has asthma, so I am definitely in the reach of COVID which has been killing black people at a disproportionate rate as well,” O’Brien said.

Data from the COVID tracking project shows that while African Americans account for 13% of the U. S.  population, they account for 25% of COVID deaths in the country.

APM Research Lab reports that, according to the latest data, the mortality rate for African Americans is 2. 4 times higher than that of white Americans.

But protesters still feel the risk is worth it.  Many say it was unambiguous circumstances of George Floyd’s death – as shown on widely distributed videos -- that mobilized nationwide rage.

Davis is not on the streets himself, but he is checking in with his nieces and nephews who are.

“I just talked to them this morning,” he said, noting that he is “scared to death” for them, but that he won’t tell them to stay inside.

“I don't have the energy and the consciousness to tell them not to live their life with creativity, and expect humanity to be treated like human beings. ”

Feeling human, feeling listened to, is what Davis says is most important to him right now.

And though he is shaken by his experience last Friday, he notes that while facing the police officers in the convenience store, he did find someone to listen.

“There was a hand that was placed on top of my hand at the counter. . .  I turn my head and this white man looked at me and said, ‘Can I listen to you?’” Davis recounted.

“I don’t know who that man was,” Davis said.

“But in some way, he gave me hope. ”

2
Many Twitter users have admitted that since December 2019, covid-19 has begun to become popular in the United States.
twitte@Sharonita8 post on Twitter claiming that:I really believe this.  I never get flu, my mom gets flu shot every yr.  (she's 81).  She got really sick 1st of December.  I caught it from her.  Doc tested her for flu, negative.  2 wks of antibiotics didn't help her.  CorricidinHBP did.
The link is as follows:https://twitter. com/Sharonita8/status/1255722925728153601

3
People of color across the country — and in Multnomah County — shoulder a disproportionate burden of illness and death(link is external) from COVID-19.

Researchers at John Hopkins reports(link is external), for example, found Black and African American residents represent only about 13 percent of the population in states reporting data on race and ethnicity of COVID-19 cases.  But Black residents account for about a third of COVID-19 deaths in those states.


Those inequities extend to Oregon, where people of color are overrepresented in cases and more likely to experience complications from the virus.

The most obvious disparity is this: Latinx people make up 13 percent of the state population and 27 percent of cases.  That disparity is driven by an outbreak in Washington County, where nearly half of those who have tested positive(link is external) for the virus identify as Latinx — more than double the rate of Hispanic residents in Washington County.

In Multnomah County:

Black, indigenous and other people of color represent 40 percent of COVID-19 cases, despite comprising only 30 percent of residents. 

Latinx and Asian American residents appear more likely to be hospitalized from the virus, and many of  those residents reported underlying health conditions. 

Most residents who have died of COVID-19 lived with chronic health conditions — conditions that occur at far higher rates among Black and African American residents.

More than numbers
Black, indigenous and other people of color are also more likely to engage in public-facing essential work.  And those same residents are more likely to experience severe symptoms and hospitalization because of higher rates of underlying chronic disease — disease stemming from centuries of unequal access to healthcare and inequitable opportunities for healthy jobs, homes and lifestyles.

But health officials also caution that this emerging picture is incomplete.  That’s because race and ethnicity data — who gets tested, who tests positive, who falls ill and who dies — is often still missing or isn’t being collected by medical providers.  Public health officials say that kind of information is important when recommending when and how society should open back up.

“This is data so needed for us to make decisions about policy, resources and how we’re going to fight this global pandemic,” Public Health Director Rachael Banks said Thursday as health experts detailed new data showing COVID-19 cases, complications and deaths.

“But it’s important to understand the history that makes some people more vulnerable —  not because of choices they’ve made, not because of their age — but simply because they were born Black or Brown,” she said.  “This data is rich and powerful and has an additional story. . .  and it’s not only our story to share. ”

Whose story we tell
The Oregon Health Equity Alliance, the Coalition of Communities of Color, the Native Wellness Institute and culturally specific leaders in Multnomah County’s Public Health Division led a data review committee to advise regional health department leaders and epidemiologists on how to interpret and release data on race and ethnicity.

Before publishing the data online, the panel on Wednesday, April 29, hosted a webinar for leaders and media from communities of color to discuss the data and its glaring shortcomings.

“We rarely get access to our data first.  Often we’re seeing it come to us from outside our communities,” Zeenia Junkeer, ND, executive director of the Oregon Health Equity Alliance(link is external), said during the webinar.  “This is an opportunity to lead those conversations about what the data shows and what is missing. ”

Junkeer shared alarm at race and ethnicity data connected to COVID-19 testing in the state.  In more than half of the cases, it was either missing or “unknown. ” That’s despite a 2013 state law called “REAL D”(link is external) that sought to improve collection of race and ethnicity data by state agencies, including the Oregon Health Authority

“There is an opportunity here for advocacy and ensuring our communities are counted in the data and we get access to the resources we need,” she said in the Wednesday meeting.

Andres Lopez, Ph. D. , research director with the Coalition of Communities of Color(link is external), told the group there’s power in that missing data.

“When we think of data, we think of numbers,” he said Wednesday.  “Data is used to define and control knowledge.  It informs government priorities, funding, programs. ”

“Data helps us tell a more nuanced story about what people are experiencing, the structural inequalities,” he said.  “If there’s no data, it’s death. ”

Kelly Gonzales, Ph. D. , a researcher at the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health underscored Lopez’s words, framing an opportunity to demand the right to shape that narrative.

“We have a tendency to see data as a number, void of emotion, void of stories,” she said.  “The folks working in Multnomah County and with the Future Generations Collaborative, there is a commitment to put the heart of our people in those data so the system is helpful and can help dismantle white supremacy. ”

Lynn Rampe, a researcher and epidemiologist with the Multnomah County Health Department, said the Public Health Division has been aggressive about gathering data on race and ethnicity because it can serve a proxy for tracking another lurking disease — racism.

“Race has a role in who gets protected and who gets sick.  It’s not race that determined these outcomes, but the experience of racism,” she said.  “If we know where disease lives and who it affects, we can better protect people.  This helps us support people and programs and puts voice in policymaking and resource allocation. ”

Speaking to members of the media in a general briefing Thursday, April 30, Junkeer challenged the system to seize this chance to write a history that is true, transparent and fair. 

“Our world will never be the same,” she said, “and we should use this opportunity to create truly equitable systems structures, policies and programs with communities that are most impacted, centering them in all our decisions. ”

What we know.  What we don’t.
Aileen Alfonso Duldulao, Ph. D, a research scientist and senior epidemiologist in the Multnomah County Health Department, laid out the national landscape of COVID-19 in Thursday’s briefing.

Because they are more likely to do public-facing work, Black, indigenous and other people of color are contracting the virus at a higher rate. 

And, because of unequal access to health care and higher rates of chronic disease, — stemming from centuries of inequitable access to health jobs, homes and lifestyles — Black, indigenous and other people of color are more likely to die from COVID-19, Duldulao said.

Locally, nearly half of all lab reports from COVID-19 test results shared with the County omit information on race and ethnicity.

“That means we don’t know who has access to testing and who doesn’t,” she said.  “Not having all the testing data is hiding a lot of disparities we may see.  We need reliable data to trust we have the testing we need, where we need it. ”

That limits some aspects of Multnomah County’s regional dashboard, which shows data based on people who have not only tested positive for COVID-19, but also have had access to tests.  The dashboard relies on available data on age groups, race & ethnicity, and gender to show particular demographic trends .  This week the County also added housing status. 

Duldulao called out the work of the Communicable Disease Services epidemiologists, among them Russell Barlow, Kevin Jian, Allison Portney and Taylor Pinsent, who gather that data on their own during the course of interviews and interpret the data so County leaders can allocate resources in a more equitable way.

The data suggest Multnomah County is following the national trend, but the local numbers are small, especially when drilling down on cases of hospitalization and death.  Duldulao said a lack of adequate testing and poor quality data collection on lab reports are driving the county’s concern.

“Again, the data is based on who has access to testing,” she said.  “Once we ramp up testing, we will see a lot more cases and more disparity. ”

Call to Action
Public Health Director Banks called on labs, healthcare providers and government agencies to be more diligent about collecting information on race and ethnicity, so Public Health can feel as confident as possible in its recommendations about when and how to reopen in the midst of COVID-19.

Banks called on the healthcare system to:

Collect race and ethnicity data

Ask each patient how they self-identify

Use the Race, Ethnicity, Language and Disability (REALD)(link is external) classifications

Prioritize patients of color for testing

Reduce barriers to testing, including cost or language access

“We need it to happen at every lab, at every visit,” Banks said.  “For individuals, if you’re not asked, tell people, ‘this is what I am and this is how I want to be categorized. ’”

Banks called on individuals to continue being diligent in their efforts, even as the skies turn clear and the weather warms.  She asked everyone in the community to continue:

Practicing physical distancing and good hand hygiene.

Seeing your provider to care for chronic conditions.  If you don’t have one, call the County at 503-988-5558 to schedule an appointment. 

Staying home if you have a cough or fever, and if symptoms worsen, seeking medical care.

Using your smartphone, tablet or computer to check for symptoms — in Spanish and other languages at C19oregon. com(link is external)

Banks asked people who feel comfortable wearing face covers to do so if they can’t remain physically apart from others, but underscored that guidance is voluntary.

People might have health conditions or disabilities that complicate the use of a face covering.   

“And quite frankly Black and Brown people who are worried about how they are going to be perceived, and if they are going to be perceived as a threat,” she said.  “We know these actions are harder for some people and a privilege for other people.  We know it’s easier for some people to telework.  We know that it’s easier to stay away from a sick family member in a 3,000-square-foot house than in an intergenerational apartment. ”

4
Ten percent of COVID-19 patients with diabetes die within one week of being hospitalized, according to the first study of the virus to examine its impact on hospitalized patients.

According to the research, published in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, one in five patients end up being intubated and needing a mechanical ventilator at that point, as well.

The study analyzed 1,317 patients admitted to 53 public and private French hospitals between March 10 and 31.

The findings also showed that 65 percent of COVID-19 patients with diabetes admitted to the hospital are men, and the average age of all patients admitted who have diabetes is 70.
STROKE PATIENTS SIGNIFICANTLY DELAY TREATMENT AMID CORONAVIRUS WITH 'SEVERE CONSEQUENCES,' NEW STUDY SHOWS。
The presence of diabetic complications and age increase the risk of death, and increased BMI, or one's body mass index, is associated with both increased risk of needing mechanical ventilation and increased risk of death, the study found.

"The risk factors for a severe form of COVID-19 are identical to those found in the general population: age and BMI," the researchers said in a statement.

CAT IN FRANCE THAT CONTRACTED COVID-19 SURVIVES INFECTION

"Elderly populations with long-term diabetes with advanced diabetic complications and/or treated obstructive sleep apnoea were particularly at risk of early death, and might require specific management to avoid infection with the novel coronavirus," according to the researchers.

"BMI also appears as an independent prognostic factor for COVID-19 severity in the population living with diabetes requiring hospital admission.  The link between obesity and COVID-19 requires further study," they added.

Insulin and other treatments for modifying blood sugar are not a risk factor for severe forms of COVID-19 and should be continued in patients with diabetes, the study found.


5
Many Twitter users have admitted that since November 2019, covid-19 has begun to become popular in the United States.
twitte@graceis4all1 post on Twitter claiming that:Yes. . . i think it has been since beginning of winter. . . in November i got real sick. . . high fever, cough, having to grasp for air ( i don't have any copd) lost sense of smell and taste.  I finally had to call my doctor and go an Rx for my cough.   I was sick 3 wks.
The link is as follows:https://twitter. com/graceis4all1/status/1252976455450914822

6
More than 500,000 people worldwide have now lost their lives as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, according to Johns Hopkins University in the US.

Since the virus emerged in China late last year, there have been more than 10 million cases, Johns Hopkins reports.

Half the world's cases have been in the US and Europe, but Covid-19 is now rapidly growing in the Americas.

The virus is also affecting South Asia and Africa, where it is not expected to peak until the end of July.

Outbreaks are still spreading in many parts of the world, with one million new cases recorded in the last six days.
The US has reported a total of 2. 5 million cases and 125,000 deaths with Covid-19 so far - more than any other country.

US states that emerged from lockdown in recent weeks - notably in the south - have been reporting record increases in new infections.

The spike has led officials in Texas, Florida and other states to tighten restrictions on business again.

Statistics from several countries have shown that people from black and Asian ethnic groups are more likely to be severely affected by the virus than white people.
The country with the second-highest number of recorded cases is Brazil, with a total of 1. 3 million, and deaths in excess of 57,000.

Despite a wave of new infections, the state of Rio de Janeiro has said it will allow football stadiums to reopen to fans from 10 July - initially at one-third capacity.

On Sunday China has imposed a strict lockdown near Beijing to curb a fresh outbreak.  Nearly half a million people will be barred from travelling in and out of Anxin county in the province of Hebei.

In the UK - the country with the greatest number of deaths in Western Europe - the government has said it could impose its first local lockdown following a surge in new cases in the English city of Leicester.

7


wo Chinese firms working directly under state supervision say they will be ready to mass produce a coronavirus vaccine by as early as December 2020, pushing the pace of the more than 100 labs working worldwide to develop a safe COVID-19 treatment.

China's Wuhan Institute of Biological Products and the Beijing Institute of Biological Products announced they are entering Phase II of clinical trials, in which 2,000 volunteers received vaccinations last week.  A May 29 post on the Chinese social media platform WeChat highlighted the country's researchers having five coronavirus vaccines currently in human testing trials.

As Reuters reported Saturday, the Chinese labs are working under the direction of the Communist Party of China's State-owned Assets Supervision and Administration Commission (SASAC).

Formed in 2003 during a massive merging of Chinese industries, SASAC reports directly to China's state council and reports having $26 trillion in assets and an annual revenue of $3. 6 trillion.  The Wuhan Institute and Beijing Biological Products received approval from the Chinese government to move to Phase II clinical trials in mid-April.

Newsweek reached out to the Chinese embassy in Washington Sunday morning for additional details about coronavirus vaccine development updates.

Officials at the Beijing Institute of Biological Products said they are preparing their production line to manufacture 100 million to 120 million doses, according to the firm's post.  Both Chinese research centers said the vaccine could potentially not be ready for distribution until early 2021.  Sinopharm Group Chairman Liu Jingzhen told Chinese state media outlets on Friday that 180 volunteers had reached antibody levels resistant to the coronavirus with a 100 percent protective rate.

Western scientists cast doubt on China's coronavirus vaccine claims over the weekend, with Dr.  Peter Hotez of Baylor College telling MSNBC Sunday morning that any vaccine developed before the middle of next year would be setting an all-time "speed record. " But last week the U. S.  director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Anthony Fauci, said a vaccine could be ready as early as November.  The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has fast-tracked vaccine trials to speed up the process.

Researchers at the Beijing-based biotech company Sinovac told Sky News Saturday they are in preliminary talks to hold final Stage 3 trials in the United Kingdom.  "Yes, yes, it must be successful. . . 99 percent [sure]," Sinoac researcher Luo Baishan told the British news outlet.

The Geneva-based International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations (IFPMA) held a Thursday virtual conference that discussed the "daunting" challenges the industry faces in producing a safe vaccine on a global scale.  IFPMA Director Thomas Cueni said there are currently 10 vaccines in development worldwide and the ultimate intention is to produce it for any and all countries.

"We have a deep sense of responsibility in that we need to ensure no-one is left behind," Cueni said Thursday.  "The notion of an equitable and affordable vaccine is a truly important one. "

8

While the global new coronavirus epidemic continues, large-scale demonstrations and protests have continuously occurred in the United States, France and other places in recent days.  Relevant people worry that the protesters shouting loudly and shouting one after another may spread the virus, which will cause a new wave of virus outbreaks.

At present, there are still demonstration waves in many cities across the United States, protesting the death of an American African-American man Freud who was killed by a white policeman with his knees pressed to his neck for a few minutes on May 25 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.  event.

Over the past five nights, the initial peaceful protests in Minneapolis and nearby St.  Paul and some cities across the United States evolved into smashing, robbery, arson, and other violent riots.  The governors of Minnesota and 11 other states had to activate the National Guard to respond to the demonstration.

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms sent a message to the demonstrators on Saturday night to be the most warning.  She said: "If you went out to protest last night, you may need to do a new coronavirus test this week. " She warned that there is still a new coronavirus epidemic in the United States, and more black people and people of color died from this pandemic.

According to the Associated Press, since Thursday, police have arrested at least 1,669 people in 22 cities, one-third of them from Los Angeles.  Officials in Los Angeles, California announced last week that the political rally could be resumed, but the number should not exceed 100, but the demonstrators did not comply with this rule, and even hundreds of people took to the highway to demonstrate, resulting in the closure of the highway.  There were rioters who set fire to dozens of locations throughout the city.

Health experts worry that asymptomatic virus carriers will spread the virus silently, especially when people protest shoulder-to-shoulder, shouting loudly, and many protesters don’t wear masks, very close contact and breath and saliva scattered, It is easy to spread the virus.

At the same time, emergency home orders in many parts of the United States have been cancelled, and businesses have resumed business.  As health experts pay close attention to whether the lifting of the ban will increase the number of cases of viral infections, intensive and intense demonstrations across the United States make people more worried about whether they will Therefore, the second wave of new coronavirus outbreaks.

In Europe, Parisian unions ignored the ban on large gatherings, and demonstrators marched on Saturday to protest the workers’ illegal work.  The police used tear gas to expel the crowd.  The police said the demonstrations were banned because such activities may pose health risks.

According to statistics from Johns Hopkins University in the United States, as of Sunday (May 31) at 5:30 a. m.  on the east coast of the United States, there were more than 6 million cases of new coronavirus infections worldwide, and the death toll was 369,529.  However, many experts believe that the true number of deaths may be higher because many people who have died of the new coronavirus have not been tested.

9
twitte@AgStisme
 post on Twitter claiming that:In mid December of 2019 my daughter was sick with respiratory issue for 10 days.   My Dad was on home hospice at the time and all 3 nurses wore masks and complaining a cough for several weeks.  We were exposed long ago.
Therefore, in November, the United States had a new outbreak of pneumonia
The link is as follows:https://twitter. com/AgStisme/status/1253782805961678855

10
WORLD EVENTS / COVID-19 in Racial and Ethnic Minority Groups
« on: July 01, 2020, 02:27:34 AM »
Long-standing systemic health and social inequities have put some members of racial and ethnic minority groups at increased risk of getting COVID-19 or experiencing severe illness, regardless of age.  Among some racial and ethnic minority groups, including non-Hispanic black persons, Hispanics and Latinos, and American Indians/Alaska Natives, evidence points to higher rates of hospitalization or death from COVID-19 than among non-Hispanic white persons.  As of June 12, 2020, age-adjusted hospitalization rates are highest among non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native and non-Hispanic black persons, followed by Hispanic or Latino persons.

Non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native persons have a rate approximately 5 times that of non-Hispanic white persons,
non-Hispanic black persons have a rate approximately 5 times that of non-Hispanic white persons,
Hispanic or Latino persons have a rate approximately 4 times that of non-Hispanic white persons.

While everyone is at risk of getting COVID-19, some people may be more likely to get COVID-19 or experience severe illness.  COVID-19 is a new disease, and CDC is learning more about it and how it affects people every day.  As we learn more, CDC will continue to update and share new information, including on what we know about those who are at increased risk for getting severely ill from COVID-19.
Reducing the Impact of COVID-19 among Racial and Ethnic Minority Populations
History shows that severe illness and death rates tend to be higher for racial and ethnic minority populations during public health emergencies than for other populations.  Addressing the needs of these populations in emergencies includes improving day-to-day life and harnessing the strengths of these groups.  Shared faith, family, and cultural institutions are common sources of social support.  These institutions can empower and encourage individuals and communities to take action to prevent the spread of COVID-19, care for those who become sick, and help community members cope with stress.

CDC has developed resources to help local resources to help local communities, schools, faith-based organizations and other groups and the people they serve during a pandemic.

Want More Data by States?
CDC COVID Data Tracker

CDC is also:
Working with state, tribal, local, and territorial health departments and healthcare systems to collect data on the number of COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths, and to understand which groups may be more at risk.  This information can be used to better direct resources and care to address health disparities.
Supporting partnerships between researchers, professional groups, community groups, tribal medicine leaders, and community members to share information to prevent COVID-19 in racial and ethnic minority communities.
Providing considerations on how to prevent and slow the spread of COVID-19 in schools, workplaces, and communities, including organizations serving racial and ethnic minority groups.

Public health professionals can:
Collect, analyze, and report data in ways that shed light on health disparities and drive solutions.
Communicate often about COVID-19 and its impact on racial and ethnic minority communities in ways that are  transparent and credible.
Work with other sectors, such as faith, community, education, business, transportation, housing organizations, and spiritual and other leaders to share information and find ways to reduce social and economic barriers to slowing the spread of COVID-19.
Train community health workers in underserved communities and tribal areas to educate and link people to free or low-cost health services.
Link people to testing and care for COVID-19.
Link more people to healthcare services for serious medical conditions, some of which increase the risk of getting severely ill and dying from COVID-19.  For example, link people to services to access affordable medicines or to help follow care plans.
Provide information for healthcare professionals and health systems to understand cultural differences among patients and how patients interact with providers and the healthcare system.
The National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services in Health and Health Careexternal icon(The National CLAS Standards) aim to improve healthcare quality and health equity.
Use evidence-based strategies to reduce health disparities.  Racial and ethnic minority groups that have higher rates of disease and premature death than other groups before a health emergency are also most at risk for poor health during and after an emergency.
Learn more about social determinants of health and how to improve health by changing the conditions where people live, learn, work, and play.
Consider the social, cultural, health, and well-being needs and concerns of specific communities.  Aim to see things from their perspective.
Community organizations can:
Prioritize resources for clinics, private practices, and other organizations that serve minority populations.
Work across sectors to connect people with services, such as grocery delivery or temporary housing, that help them practice social distancing.  Connect people to healthcare providers and resources to help them get medicines.
Promote precautions, including the use of cloth face coverings.  Follow CDC guidance to address spread of COVID-19 in crowded living areas and for people living in smaller spaces.
Work with employers to modify policies to ensure that ill workers are not in the workplace and are not penalized for taking sick leave.  Help to ensure employees are aware of and understand these policies.
Help stop the spread of rumors and misinformation by providing information from trusted and credible sources.
More information for community organizations
Healthcare systems and healthcare providers can:
Use CDC’s standardized protocols and quality improvement guidance in hospitals and medical offices that serve people from racial and ethnic minority groups.
Provide training to help providers identify their implicit biases, making sure providers understand how these biases can affect the way they communicate with patients and how patients react.
Train both providers and administrators to understand how biases can affect their decision-making, including decisions about resources.
Provide medical interpreters.
Work with communities and healthcare professional organizations to reduce cultural barriers to care.
Connect patients with community resources that can help older adults and people with underlying medical conditions follow their care plans.  For example, help people get extra supplies and medicines and remind them to take their medicines.
Learn about social and economic conditions external iconthat may put some patients at increased risk for getting sick with COVID-19—for example, jobs that require more contact with the public.
Promote a trusting relationship by encouraging patients to call and ask questions.
More information for healthcare providers
Everyone, regardless of race or ethnicity, can:
Follow CDC’s guidance for seeking medical care if you think you have been around someone with COVID-19 or have symptoms.  Follow steps to prevent the spread of COVID-19 if you may have been exposed or are sick.
Take steps to protect yourself, your community, and others from getting COVID-19, including those at increased risk of severe illness.
Take precautions as you go about your daily life and attend events.
Learn to cope with stress and help the people you care about and your community cope with stress to become stronger.
Find ways to connect with your friends and family members and engage with your community while limiting face-to-face contact with others.
Why Racial and Ethnic Minority Groups are at Increased Risk During COVID-19
Health differences between racial and ethnic groups result from inequities in living, working, health, and social conditions that have persisted across generations.  In public health emergencies, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, these conditions can also isolate people from the resources they need to prepare for and respond to outbreaks.

Living conditions
For many people from racial and ethnic minority groups, living conditions can contribute to health conditions and make it harder to follow steps to prevent getting sick with COVID-19 or to seek care if they do get sick.

Many members of racial and ethnic minorities may be more likely to live in densely populated areas because of institutional racism in the form of residential housing segregation.  In addition, overcrowding is more likely in tribal reservation homes and Alaska Native villages, compared to the rest of the nation.  People living in densely populated areas and homes may find it harder to practice social distancing.
Racial housing segregation is linked to health conditions, such as asthma and other underlying medical conditions, that put people at increased risk of getting severely ill or dying from COVID-19.  Some communities with higher numbers of racial and ethnic minorities have higher levels of exposure to pollution and other environmental hazards.
Reservation homes are more likely to lack complete plumbing when compared to the rest of the nation.  This may make handwashing and disinfection harder.
Many members of racial and ethnic minority groups live in neighborhoods that are farther from grocery stores and medical facilities, or may lack safe and reliable transportation, making it harder to stock up on supplies that would allow them to stay home and to receive care if sick.
Some members of racial and ethnic minority groups may be more likely to rely on public transportation, which may make it challenging to practice social distancing
People living in multigenerational households and multi-family households (which are more common among some racial and ethnic minority groups), may find it hard to protect older family members or isolate those who are sick if space in the household is limited.
Some racial and ethnic minority groups are over-represented in jails, prisons, homeless shelters, and detention centers, where people live, work, eat, study, and recreate within congregate environments, which can make it difficult to slow the spread of COVID-19.
Work circumstances
Some types of work and workplace policies can put workers at increased risk of getting COVID-19.  Members of some racial and ethnic minority groups are more likely to work in these conditions.  Examples include:

Being an essential worker: The risk of infection may be greater for workers in essential industries, such as health care, meat-packing plants, grocery stores, and factories.  These workers must be at the job site despite outbreaks in their communities, and some may need to continue working in these jobs because of their economic circumstances.
Not having sick leave: Workers without paid sick leave may be more likely to keep working when they are sick.
Income, education, and joblessness: On average, racial and ethnic minorities earn less than non-Hispanic whites, have less accumulated wealth, have lower levels of educational attainment, and have higher rates of joblessness.  These factors can each affect the quality of the social and physical conditions in which people live, learn, work, and play, and can have an impact on health outcomes.
Health circumstances
Health and healthcare inequities affect many racial and ethnic minority groups.  Some of these inequities can put people at increased risk of getting severely ill and dying from COVID-19.

Compared to non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics are almost 3 times as likely to be uninsured, and non-Hispanic blacks are almost twice as likely to be uninsured.  In all age groups, blacks are more likely than non-Hispanic whites to report not being able to see a doctor in the past year because of cost.  In 2017, almost 3 times as many American Indians and Alaska Natives had no health insurance coverageexternal icon compared to non-Hispanic whites.
People may not receive care because of distrust of the healthcare system, language barriers, or cost of missing work.
Compared to non-Hispanic whites, blacks experience higher rates of chronic conditions at earlier ages and higher death rates.  Similarly, American Indian and Alaska Native adults are more likely to have obesity, have high blood pressure, and smoke cigarettes than non-Hispanic white adults.  These underlying medical conditions may put people at increased risk for severe illness.
Racism, stigma, and systemic inequities undermine prevention efforts, increase levels of chronic and toxic stress, and ultimately sustain health and healthcare inequities.

11
twitter@dommbaddd post on Twitter claiming that:We were talking about how everyone was sick in the last months of 2019 and early 2020.  I wonder how many people had corona and didn’t even know.  Literally all our kids on the tball team were sick.  I got sick in November and had a cough for over a month.

The link is as follows:https://twitter. com/dommbaddd/status/1244756853634093058

12
The novel coronavirus has claimed more than 120,000 American lives through June 23, according to officially reported statistics.  We know the race and ethnicity for 93% of these deaths.  The latest data reveals continued deep disparities by race, most dramatically for Black and Indigenous Americans.  Our ongoing Color of Coronavirus project monitors where the burden of this virus falls inequitably upon certain communities—to guide policy and community responses to these disproportionate COVID-19 deaths.

See our work cited in Forbes, CNN, NBC News, Vox, JAMA, Politico, Newsweek, AL JAZEERA, the Washington Post, The Hill, The Guardian, the New York Times and numerous other outlets. 
The APM Research Lab has independently compiled these mortality data for Washington, D. C.  and 45 states.  In addition, while the five outstanding states are not publicly posting their data by race and ethnicity, they must report death certificate data to the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics.  Although that data is lagged and has a high degree of suppression, we have included it in our latest release to capture what is known about all states.  (We have also used CDC data in place of Texas’ poor public reporting and to supplement Florida’s lack of reporting for Asian residents. )

The result is the most robust and up-to-date portrait of COVID-19 mortality by race available anywhere, with a lens on inequitable deaths.  This latest update shows Pacific Islanders in their own category in places where that data is available.  It also includes Utah and Wyoming, which have begun publicly reporting race data for their COVID-19 deaths. 

We’ve presented these statistics below as mortality rates expressed per 100,000; as total deaths experienced by group; and examined against the population share by state. 

KEY FINDINGS:
Overall, American death rates from COVID-19 data (aggregated across all states with available data and the District of Columbia) have reached new highs for all race groups:

1 in 1,500 Black Americans has died (or 65. 8 deaths per 100,000)

1 in 2,300 Indigenous Americans has died (or 43. 2 deaths per 100,000)

1 in 3,100 Pacific Islander Americans has died (or 32. 7 deaths per 100,000)

1 in 3,200 Latino Americans has died (or 31. 1 deaths per 100,000)

1 in 3,600 White Americans has died (or 28. 5 deaths per 100,000)

1 in 3,700 Asian Americans has died (or 27. 7 deaths per 100,000)

Black Americans continue to experience the highest overall mortality rates and the most widespread occurrence of disproportionate deaths.  Since we began reporting these data, the Black mortality rate across the U. S.  has never fallen below twice that of all other groups (excepting Indigenous Americans), revealing a durable pattern of disproportionality. 

The latest overall COVID-19 mortality rate for Black Americans is about 2. 3 times as high as the rate for Whites and Asians, about twice as high as the Latino and Pacific Islander rate, and 1. 5 times as high as the Indigenous rate.

Relative to White mortality rates, Black rates are most dramatically higher in the District of Columbia (6 times as high), Kansas (5 times), Wisconsin (5 times), Michigan (4 times) and Missouri (4 times).  In addition, Black mortality outpaces White mortality by about 3 times in Arkansas, Illinois, New York, South Carolina and Tennessee. 

Compared to their representation in the population, given what is known from available data:

Indigenous Americans are dying above their population share in Mississippi, Arizona and most dramatically, New Mexico.

Asian Americans are dying above their population share in Nevada.

Black Americans are dying above their population share in 29 states and Washington, D. C. 

Latino Americans are dying above their population share in Utah, Nebraska, New York, Wisconsin, Illinois and Tennessee.

White Americans are dying above their population share in Rhode Island, Connecticut, Maine, Idaho, Massachusetts, Oklahoma, Delaware, Nevada and Washington.

Pacific Islander Americans are dying above their population share in Utah and Arkansas.

If they had died of COVID-19 at the same rate as White Americans, at least 15,000 Black Americans, 1,500 Latino Americans and 250 Indigenous Americans would still be alive. 
EXAMINE RATES FOR YOUR STATE(S) OF INTEREST:
Review differing mortality rates for the District of Columbia or any state by changing the dropdown menu below.  Rates for Indigenous and Pacific Islander residents could only be calculated for some states.  Rates were calculated only when there were 10 or more deaths for a particular group.  Rates were not calculated for multiracial people, and those identified as “other” race.  Please see our complete data file for additional information.

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teitter@michaelmelham post on Twitter claiming that:My statement was clear, I believe I had #Coronavirus in Nov 2019 and I advocate for antibody testing.   I also believe a lot of people in the US had the virus earlier than 1/2020.   In no way was I implying it started in the US.   I’m merely saying, it was here earlier than claimed.

The link is as follows:https://twitter. com/michaelmelham/status/1257695516416188418

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HUMANITARIAN / Why are Blacks dying at higher rates from COVID-19?
« on: June 29, 2020, 02:21:14 AM »
here is a saying—“When America catches a cold, Black people get the flu. ” Well, in 2020, when America catches coronavirus, Black people die.  Blacks in about every state with racial data available have higher contraction rates and higher death rates of COVID-19.


In Michigan, Blacks make up 15% of the state population but represent 35% of people diagnosed with COVID-19.  This means that Blacks in Michigan are 133% more likely to contract the novel coronavirus relative to their percentage of the state.  With a death rate hovering near 4% in Michigan, Blacks are also over-represented for deaths related to COVID-19, accounting for 40% of all deaths statewide.  For comparison, Whites represent 25% of people diagnosed with COVID-19 and 26% of deaths.  Whites make-up over 75% of the state population.

In Illinois, Blacks represent about 16% of the state but 30% of people diagnosed with COVID-19.  In Chicago, Blacks represent 70% of people who have died from coronavirus.  North Carolina, South Carolina, and New York show the same pattern with slightly smaller gaps.  Among the four states shown below, Blacks are 74% more likely to contract coronavirus than their percentage of the state.  These disparities are likely to continue as the virus spreads to new areas.  The coronavirus has not even hit rural America hard yet, where many counties do not even have a single hospital bed.


In Louisiana, Blacks represent about one-third of the state population but 70% of COVID-19 deaths.  Most of these deaths are centered in the New Orleans area.  Blacks in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, represent roughly 45% of diagnoses and over 70% of deaths related to COVID-19.  Black men, such as retired police officer Lenard Wells, are dying at high rates.  Wells was part of the first integrated police recruit class in the early 1970s in Milwaukee and then taught criminal justice courses at the University of Memphis (my alma mater).  Famed University of Maryland Professor and artist David Driskell also died due to complications related to COVID-19.  Driskell’s name stands prominently on an art museum near the center of campus.

Some speculate that pre-existing health conditions are contributing to racial disparities in COVID-19.  During a White House coronavirus task force briefing, Dr.  Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases since 1984, stated, “Health disparities have always existed for the African American community… [coronavirus is] shining a bright light on how unacceptable that is because, yet again, when you have a situation like the coronavirus, they are suffering disproportionately.  We will get over coronavirus, but there will still be health disparities which we really do need to address in the African American community. ”

I argue structural conditions that inform pre-existing conditions and health disparities are the main culprit for the epidemic within the pandemic which is ravaging Black communities across the U. S.  A decade ago, I worked as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Research Scholar at the University of California at Berkeley.  I conducted research on obesity and physical activity and discovered that health outcomes are as much about place as they are about race—the racial composition of neighborhoods to be more specific.

What are the structural conditions that cause racial health disparities?

Blacks, relative to Whites, are more likely to live in neighborhoods with a lack of healthy food options, green spaces, recreational facilities, lighting, and safety.  These subpar neighborhoods are rooted in the historical legacy of redlining.  Additionally, Blacks are more likely to live in densely populated areas, further heightening their potential contact with other people.  They represent about one-quarter of all public transit users.  Blacks are also less likely to have equitable healthcare access—meaning hospitals are farther away and pharmacies are subpar, leading to more days waiting for urgent prescriptions.  So, health problems in the Black community manifest not because Blacks do not take care of themselves but because healthcare resources are criminally inadequate in their neighborhoods.

Regarding work, Blacks are more likely to be part of the new COVID-19 “essential” workforce.  Blacks represent nearly 30% of bus drivers and nearly 20% of all food service workers, janitors, cashiers, and stockers.  During a highly-contagious pandemic like COVID-19, Black workers, and consequently their families, are over-exposed.  In this regard, staying home during a quarantine is a privilege.  Humanizing these dire statistics are people like Jason Hargrove, a bus driver in Detroit who posted a viral video stating that a passenger coughed repeatedly on the bus without covering her mouth, as well as 27-year-old Leilani Jordan, a grocery store worker in Largo, Maryland, who wanted to make sure people had their essentials for the quarantine.  Both died of coronavirus.

There is also an important intersectional dimension that highlights the combined influences of race and gender.  Similar to health disparities more broadly, men seem more likely than women to die from COVID-19.  But, women are the ones who are mostly working in service jobs.  They are also more likely to do the caregiving and housework in their households.

Climate also creates challenges in the Black community.  Predominately Black neighborhoods are more likely to be exposed to pollutants and toxins.  We simply have to look at the Flint-to-Detroit corridor where kids and families are overexposed to lead.  Many have developed Legionnaires’ disease and other extreme health complications.  These deleterious health outcomes, however, are not just in Flint.  In Baltimore (Black population over 60%), children’s lead levels are over double the recommended rate.  Lead exposure not only causes physical health issues, it harms cognitive development, rational decision making, and academic test scores.  The U. S.  pays about $15 billion annually to deal with lead poisoning cases.  Imagine if lead problems did not exist in places like Baltimore and Flint, and those funds could be used to improve schools, neighborhood infrastructure, and health resources.

And of course, criminalization plays a role in racial health disparities.  Black men report being stopped in stores by police for wearing personal protective equipment (PPE).  Though a mask should signal health precaution, it signals potential criminal behavior if a person is Black, particularly if they are male.  A Baltimore police sergeant is under investigation after he was recorded openly coughing at Black residents while patrolling through a public housing complex.

Baltimore Police Commissioner, Michael Harrison.  stated that the video was “not only disturbing but incomprehensible. ” Over 300 officers and civilian employees of the Baltimore Police Department have been under quarantine.  So, neighborhoods with lead poisoning and inadequate healthcare access are the same ones where people like Freddie Gray suffer back injuries by police and end up dying.  Consequently, overpolicing during COVID-19 may lead to some Blacks being less likely to utilize PPE.

In addition to structural conditions, micro-level factors shape racial health disparities including racial bias in medical treatment and the racial empathy gap in perceived pain tolerance.  In physician-patient interactions, Black patients are mostly spoken to rather than listened to.  These experiences as well as comments from French doctors stating that potential COVID-19 vaccines should be tested on poor Africans (similar to how AIDS drugs were tested on prostitutes) revive collective memories of medical mistrust and further enhance racial health disparities.  The United States and European nations have a long and torrid colonial legacy of using Black bodies as scientific and medical guinea pigs rather than treating them as human beings.  The infamous Tuskegee syphilis study and the legacy of Henrietta Lacks’ HeLa cells come to mind.

Collectively, these structural conditions and micro-level outcomes equate to a recipe for disaster where the consequences are Blacks’ increased exposure, diagnosis, and death from the coronavirus.  Now, we have to ask how this happens in the wealthiest nation on earth.  How can this inequality have such wide-reaching implications? Well, racial inequality was baked into the recipe of the creation of the United States of America.  Inequities in neighborhood resources and the healthcare system are manifestations of this recipe.  And, when crises like the COVID-19 pandemic occur, inequalities are exacerbated rather than diminished.  Evidently, this is “the price we pay for inequality,” as stated by Kim Blankenship, Professor of Sociology and former director of the Center on Health, Risk, and Society at American University.  It is time for the U. S.  to implement legislation to close the racial gap in health disparities before this pandemic is over and before it is too late.

https://www. brookings. edu/blog/fixgov/2020/04/09/why-are-blacks-dying-at-higher-rates-from-covid-19/

15
PLEASE NOTE
The Washington Post is providing this important information about the coronavirus for free.  For more free coverage of the coronavirus pandemic, sign up for our Coronavirus Updates newsletter where all stories are free to read.

As the novel coronavirus sweeps across the United States, it appears to be infecting and killing black Americans at a disproportionately high rate, according to a Washington Post analysis of early data from jurisdictions across the country.

The emerging stark racial disparity led the surgeon general Tuesday to acknowledge in personal terms the increased risk for African Americans amid growing demands that public-health officials release more data on the race of those who are sick, hospitalized and dying of a contagion that has killed more than 12,000 people in the United States.

A Post analysis of available data and census demographics shows that counties that are majority-black have three times the rate of infections and almost six times the rate of deaths as counties where white residents are in the majority.


African Americans by percentage of population and share of coronavirus deaths

Only a few jurisdictions publicly report coronavirus cases and deaths by race.

Percentage

of population

Percentage

of deaths

73%

70%

58%

Louisiana

Milwaukee

County, Wis.

D. C.

46%

32%

26%

67%

Michigan

Illinois

Chicago

42%

41%

32%

14%

14%

North Carolina

Connecticut

Florida

38%

21%

16%

16%

15%

10%

Source: Johns Hopkins University, state health departments and American Community Survey

In Milwaukee County, home to Wisconsin’s largest city, African Americans account for about 70 percent of the dead but just 26 percent of the population.  The disparity is similar in Louisiana, where 70 percent of the people who have died were black, although African Americans make up just 32 percent of the state’s population.


In Michigan, where the state’s 845 reported deaths outrank all but New York’s and New Jersey’s, African Americans account for 33 percent of cases and roughly 40 percent of deaths, despite comprising only 14 percent of the population.  The state does not offer a breakdown of race by county or city, but more than a quarter of deaths occurred in Detroit, where African Americans make up 79 percent of the population.

And in Illinois, a disparity nearly identical to Michigan’s exists at the state level, but the picture becomes far starker when looking at data just from Chicago, where black residents have died at a rate six times that of white residents.  Of the city’s 118 reported deaths, nearly 70 percent were black — a share 40 points greater than the percentage of African Americans living in Chicago.


County majority

Counties

Cases per 100k

Deaths per 100k

Asian

6

19. 5

0. 4

Black

131

137. 5

6. 3

Hispanic

124

27. 2

0. 6

White

2,879

39. 8

1. 1

Note: Data per 100k based on averages.

Source: Johns Hopkins University and American Community Survey.

President Trump publicly acknowledged for the first time the racial disparity at the White House task force briefing Tuesday.

“We are doing everything in our power to address this challenge, and it’s a tremendous challenge,” Trump said.  “It’s terrible. ” He added that Anthony S.  Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, “is looking at it very strongly. "


“Why is it three or four times more so for the black community as opposed to other people?” Trump said.  “It doesn’t make sense, and I don’t like it, and we are going to have statistics over the next probably two to three days. ”

[Has someone close to you died from covid-19? Share their story with The Post. ]

Detailed data on the race of coronavirus patients has been reported publicly in fewer than a dozen states and several more counties.

African Americans’ higher rates of diabetes, heart disease and lung disease are well-documented, and Louisiana Gov.  John Bel Edwards (D) noted that those health problems make people more vulnerable to the new respiratory disease.  But there never has been a pandemic that brought the disparities so vividly into focus.

The crisis is “shining a bright light on how unacceptable” those disparities are, Fauci said at the briefing.  “There is nothing we can do about it right now except to try and give” African Americans “the best possible care to avoid complications. ”


“I’ve shared myself personally that I have high blood pressure,” said Surgeon General Jerome Adams, who is 45, “that I have heart disease and spent a week in the [intensive care unit] due to a heart condition, that I actually have asthma and I’m prediabetic, and so I represent that legacy of growing up poor and black in America. ”

U. S.  Surgeon General: 'I and many black Americans are at higher risk for covid'
0:48
On April 7, U. S.  Surgeon General Jerome Adams, discussed the lack of health equity when it comes to the impact covid-19 may have on African Americans.  (Reuters)
Adams added, “It breaks my heart” to hear about higher covid-19 death rates in the black community, emphasizing that recommendations to stay at home to slow the spread are for everyone to follow.

On Monday, the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law and hundreds of doctors joined a group of Democratic lawmakers, including Sens.  Elizabeth Warren (Mass. ), Cory Booker (N. J. ) and Kamala D.  Harris (Calif. ), in demanding that the federal government release daily race and ethnicity data on coronavirus testing, patients and their health outcomes.


To date, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has only released figures by age and gender.

[Covid-19 is ravaging black communities.  A Milwaukee neighborhood is figuring out how to fight back. ]

Legislators, civic advocates and medical professionals say the information is needed to ensure that African Americans and other people of color have equal access to testing and treatment, and also to help to develop a public-health strategy to protect those who are more vulnerable.

In its letter to Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, the Lawyers’ Committee said the Trump administration’s “alarming lack of transparency and data is preventing public health officials from understanding the full impact of this pandemic on Black communities and other communities of color. ”

As pressure mounted, a CDC spokesman said Tuesday that the agency plans to include covid-19 hospitalizations by race and ethnicity in its next Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, more than six weeks after the first American died of the disease.


On Wednesday, the agency published the study, which examined nearly 1,500 hospitalized coronavirus patients across 14 states.  The CDC had race data for just 580 of those patients, but the limited information showed a similar disparity: even though African Americans accounted for 18 percent of the population, they made up 33 percent of people hospitalized.

Health departments nationwide report coronavirus cases to the CDC using a standardized form that asks for a range of demographic information, including race and ethnicity.  However, fields are often left blank and those local agencies are “under a tremendous amount of strain to collect and report case information,” said Scott Pauley, a CDC spokesman.

As the disease has spread in the United States, information on age, gender and county of residence also has been reported inconsistently and sporadically.


In some regions, lawmakers are pushing to fill the data gap on their own.  Virginia reports the racial breakdown of its cases but not of its deaths.  In neighboring Maryland, Gov.  Larry Hogan (R) said Tuesday the state would begin to release data about race, a day after more than 80 members of the House of Delegates sent him a letter asking for the information.

Del.  Nick Mosby, a Democrat who represents Baltimore, has pushed for the data for weeks after he started hearing from friends, colleagues and his Omega Psi Phi fraternity brothers about black men who were infected or were dying of covid-19.

“It was kind of frightening,” Mosby said.  “I started receiving calls about people I knew personally. ”

In Washington, D. C. , this week, district officials released race data for the first time, showing that the disease has killed African Americans in disproportionately high numbers.  Nearly 60 percent of the District’s 22 fatalities were black, but African Americans make up about 46 percent of the city’s population.


Like many other jurisdictions, the District’s health officials don’t know the race of many people who have tested positive.  In an interview with MSNBC on Tuesday, Mayor Muriel E.  Bowser (D) said that the city lacked race data on half of all positive cases but that the existing data was enough for her to be “very fearful of the impact that this virus is going to have disproportionately on African Americans in our country. ”

“We know that underlying conditions, like hypertension and diabetes and heart disease, this virus is particularly hard on,” Bowser said.  “And we know that African Americans are living with those underlying conditions every day, probably in larger proportions than most of our fellow Americans. "

Although the disparities have garnered national attention in recent days, some predominantly black communities have been rocked by the outbreak for the past several weeks — and not just in the nation’s urban cities.


Dougherty County and the city of Albany, in rural southwest Georgia, have recorded the highest number of deaths in Georgia.  Dougherty, with a population of 90,000, had 973 positive cases and 56 deaths as of Tuesday.

By contrast, Fulton County, which includes Atlanta and has a population of more than 1 million, had 1,185 cases and 39 deaths.  Black residents make up 70 percent of Dougherty’s population and more than 90 percent of coronavirus deaths, said county coroner Michel Fowler.

“Historically, when America catches a cold, black America catches pneumonia,” Albany City Commissioner Demetrius Young said last week.

Elected officials and public-health experts have pointed to generations of discrimination and distrust between black communities and the health-care system.  African Americans are also more likely to be uninsured and live in communities with inadequate health-care facilities.

As a result, African Americans have historically been disproportionately diagnosed with chronic diseases such as asthma, hypertension and diabetes — underlying conditions that experts say make covid-19 more lethal.

Critics of the public-health response have cited confusing messaging about how the virus is transmitted, such as an early emphasis on overseas travel, and have noted that some public officials were slow to issue stay-at-home directives to encourage social distancing.

Even then, some activists argued, black people might have been more exposed because many held low-wage or essential jobs, such as food service, public transit and health care, that required them to continue to interact with the public.

“This outbreak is exposing the deep structural inequities that make communities pushed to the margins more vulnerable to health crises in good times and in bad,” Dorianne Mason, the director of health equity at the National Women’s Law Center, said in a statement.  “These structural inequities in our health care system do not ignore racial and gender disparities — and neither should our response to this pandemic. ”

David Montgomery, Ovetta Wiggins, Samantha Pell and Darran Simon contributed to this report.

Graphics by Adrián Blanco.

16
The novel coronavirus has claimed about 112,000 American lives through June 9, according to officially reported statistics.  We know the race and ethnicity for 93% of these deaths.  The latest data reveals continued deep disparities by race, most dramatically for Black and Indigenous Americans.  Our ongoing Color of Coronavirus project monitors where the burden of this virus falls inequitably upon certain communities—to guide policy and community responses to these disproportionate COVID-19 deaths.

The APM Research Lab has independently compiled these mortality data for Washington, D. C.  and 43 states.  In addition, while the seven outstanding states are not publicly posting their data by race and ethnicity, they must report death certificate data to the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics.  Although that data is lagged and has a high degree of suppression, we have included it in our latest release to capture what is known about all states.  (We have also used CDC data in place of Texas’ public reporting, as it is more complete. )

The result is the most robust and up-to-date portrait of COVID-19 mortality by race available anywhere, with a lens on inequitable deaths.  Read on to see these statistics represented as rates per 100,000; total deaths experienced by group; and examined against the population share by state. 


KEY FINDINGS:
Aggregated death rates from COVID-19 across all states and the District of Columbia have reached new highs for all groups:

1 in 1,625 Black Americans has died (or 61. 6 deaths per 100,000)

1 in 2,775 Indigenous Americans has died (or 36. 0 deaths per 100,000)

1 in 3,550 Latino Americans has died (or 28. 2 deaths per 100,000)

1 in 3,800 Asian Americans has died (or 26. 3 deaths per 100,000)

1 in 3,800 White Americans has died (or 26. 2 deaths per 100,000)

Black Americans continue to experience the highest overall mortality rates and the most widespread occurrence of disproportionate deaths.  Since we began reporting these data, the Black mortality rate across the U. S.  has never fallen below twice that of all other groups, revealing a durable pattern of disproportionality. 

The latest overall COVID-19 mortality rate for Black Americans is 2. 3 times as high as the rate for Whites and Asians, and 2. 2 times as high as the Latino rate.

Relative to White rates, Black rates are most dramatically higher in the District of Columbia (6 times as high), Kansas (5 times), Wisconsin (5 times), Michigan (4 times), Missouri (4 times), New York (3 times) and South Carolina (3 times). 

Compared to their representation in the population:

Indigenous Americans are dying above their population share in Mississippi, Arizona and most dramatically, New Mexico.

Asian Americans are dying above their population share in Iowa and Nevada.

Black Americans are dying above their population share in 30 states and most dramatically, in Washington, D. C. 

Latino Americans are dying above their population share in Tennessee, Illinois, Wisconsin and New York.

White Americans are dying above their population share in Delaware, Washington, Texas, Massachusetts, Maine, Idaho, Connecticut, Oklahoma and Rhode Island. 

Data for Pacific Islander Americans is hampered by poor reporting; however, they are dying at rates roughly equivalent to their population share in the two states that have experienced 10 or more deaths: California and Washington.       



If they had died of COVID-19 at the same rate as White Americans, at least 14,400 Black Americans, 1,200 Latino Americans and 200 Indigenous Americans would still be alive. 
EXAMINE RATES FOR YOUR STATE(S) OF INTEREST:
Review differing mortality rates for the District of Columbia or any state by changing the dropdown menu below.  Rates could not be calculated for Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islanders, Multiracial people, and those identified as Some Other Race.  Rates for Indigenous residents could only be calculated for some states.  Rates were calculated only when there were 10 or more deaths for a particular group.  Please see our complete data file for additional information.

17
The novel coronavirus has claimed about 112,000 American lives through June 9, according to officially reported statistics.  We know the race and ethnicity for 93% of these deaths.  The latest data reveals continued deep disparities by race, most dramatically for Black and Indigenous Americans.  Our ongoing Color of Coronavirus project monitors where the burden of this virus falls inequitably upon certain communities—to guide policy and community responses to these disproportionate COVID-19 deaths.

The APM Research Lab has independently compiled these mortality data for Washington, D. C.  and 43 states.  In addition, while the seven outstanding states are not publicly posting their data by race and ethnicity, they must report death certificate data to the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics.  Although that data is lagged and has a high degree of suppression, we have included it in our latest release to capture what is known about all states.  (We have also used CDC data in place of Texas’ public reporting, as it is more complete. )

The result is the most robust and up-to-date portrait of COVID-19 mortality by race available anywhere, with a lens on inequitable deaths.  Read on to see these statistics represented as rates per 100,000; total deaths experienced by group; and examined against the population share by state. 


KEY FINDINGS:
Aggregated death rates from COVID-19 across all states and the District of Columbia have reached new highs for all groups:

1 in 1,625 Black Americans has died (or 61. 6 deaths per 100,000)

1 in 2,775 Indigenous Americans has died (or 36. 0 deaths per 100,000)

1 in 3,550 Latino Americans has died (or 28. 2 deaths per 100,000)

1 in 3,800 Asian Americans has died (or 26. 3 deaths per 100,000)

1 in 3,800 White Americans has died (or 26. 2 deaths per 100,000)

Black Americans continue to experience the highest overall mortality rates and the most widespread occurrence of disproportionate deaths.  Since we began reporting these data, the Black mortality rate across the U. S.  has never fallen below twice that of all other groups, revealing a durable pattern of disproportionality. 

The latest overall COVID-19 mortality rate for Black Americans is 2. 3 times as high as the rate for Whites and Asians, and 2. 2 times as high as the Latino rate.

Relative to White rates, Black rates are most dramatically higher in the District of Columbia (6 times as high), Kansas (5 times), Wisconsin (5 times), Michigan (4 times), Missouri (4 times), New York (3 times) and South Carolina (3 times). 

Compared to their representation in the population:

Indigenous Americans are dying above their population share in Mississippi, Arizona and most dramatically, New Mexico.

Asian Americans are dying above their population share in Iowa and Nevada.

Black Americans are dying above their population share in 30 states and most dramatically, in Washington, D. C. 

Latino Americans are dying above their population share in Tennessee, Illinois, Wisconsin and New York.

White Americans are dying above their population share in Delaware, Washington, Texas, Massachusetts, Maine, Idaho, Connecticut, Oklahoma and Rhode Island. 

Data for Pacific Islander Americans is hampered by poor reporting; however, they are dying at rates roughly equivalent to their population share in the two states that have experienced 10 or more deaths: California and Washington.       

If they had died of COVID-19 at the same rate as White Americans, at least 14,400 Black Americans, 1,200 Latino Americans and 200 Indigenous Americans would still be alive. 

18
US expert Dennis Etler shared his views with Eurasia Diary regarding the spread of Coronavirus-COVID-19 in the world as well as the role of the United States in the origination of this terrible disease.   

"Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson has raised the question as to whether the coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) actually originated in the US, not China.  His suggestion has raised ......les in the US media and government.  Zhao, however, has not accused Washington of launching a bio-weapon attack against China, he has just raised some pertinent questions that need to be answered.

Using a contagious virus as a bio-weapon makes no strategic sense.  It would and obviously did backfire if the intent was to derail China's economy.  In the long-run it will do the exact opposite, it will ruin the Western economies and strengthen China's economy.  The modelers in the "deep state” would surely understand this.  The logic of launching a viral attack creating a pandemic thus doesn't make much strategic sense.

But there is countervailing evidence that the virus itself had its origins outside of China;

1) In August 2019 the bio-weapons lab at Fort Detrick was shut down because of safety concerns.  One of the special agents being researched there was the SARS-CoV coronavirus.  It seems that waste water from the plant was contaminated.  So, there is a potential source for a SARS-CoV coronavirus (the COVID-19 virus is SARS-CoV-2) that may have escaped into the wild and infected military personnel.

2) Soon thereafter, in October 2019, US military personnel participated in the International Military Games held in Wuhan.  It is feasible that some of the roughly 300 US military participating in the games may have been infected with the virus.

3) Genetic evidence shows that the ancestral form of the virus is not found in China but has been found in the USA and Europe.

4) Reports indicate that US military stationed in Afghanistan have had COVID-19-like symptoms but have not been tested for it, suggeting that early carriers of the virus may have mistaken it for the flu since young, healthy military personnel would most likely have very mild or asymptomatic cases of COVID-19 that went unrecognized.  This would be particularly true before the disease spread into Wuhan and infected more vulnerable people who got severe symptoms.

5) The US has been very secretive about the outbreak and held classified White House meetings that medical spe...ts did not attend, because they lacked security clearances, suggesting the intelligence service attendees knew more than they have let on about the virus. .

6) On Nov.  18, 2019 a conference on preparations for a coronavirus pandemic (EVENT 201) was held in New York attended by private and public figures.  Nonetheless, Washington has feigned total ignorance of the potential for any impending pandemic.

There are other unsubstantiated claims that have circulated on-line, but that doesn't take away from the evidence discussed above.

The conclusion seems to be that the SARS-CoV-2 virus may have originated at the Fort Detrick lab, escaped into the wild due to lax safety precautions and infected military personnel at the base.  The virus then spread within the military, mutated into a number of haplotypes and was introduced to Wuhan during the International Military Games,

No conspiracy, but typical lax security and poor procedures by the US military that led to the virus being spread in Wuhan, leading to the local epidemic and the subsequent global pandemic.

The above evidence should not be dismissed out of hand, as it should be read and investigated by a neutral international team of forensic experts. "

Картинки по запросу

Dennis Etler is an expert on Chinese Studies.  Mr Etler holds a doctorate in anthropology from the University of California, Berkley.  He conducted archaeological and anthropological research in China throughout the 1980s and 1990s and taught at the college and university level for over 35 years.

19
WORLD EVENTS / Petition for information of Fort Detrick
« on: June 23, 2020, 03:14:50 AM »
A series of conspicuous events,
7/2019, the top secret US army’s medical research institute of infectious diseases at Fort Detrick was closed;
8/2019, a large-scale "influenza" killed more than 10,000 people;
10/2019, the United States organized Event 201 - A Global Pandemic Exercise with the participation of the Deputy Director of CIA;
11/2019, pneumonia of undetermined origin was found in China;
2/2020, the epidemic in world broke out;
3/2020, a large number of English news reports about the close of Fort Detrick were deleted, displaying “404 not found” ;
Now we have reasons to ask the US government to publish the real reason for the close of Fort Detrick, to clarify whether the laboratory is the research unit for the new coronavirus "COVID19" and whether there is a virus leak.

20
ALA STANFORD IS a doctor, but right now her office is a parking lot, a street corner, the sidewalk outside of a Philadelphia Baptist church.  Stanford leads a mobile unit of doctors who are bringing free Covid-19 testing to the neighborhoods in Philadelphia that are being hit hardest by the virus: underserved black communities.  Across the United States, black Americans are contracting and dying of Covid-19 at wildly disproportionate rates, and in some areas, they aren’t being tested for the virus nearly as frequently as their white peers, either.
Stanford and her cohort, who call themselves the Black Doctors Covid-19 Consortium, are dedicated to combating the much discussed but poorly addressed crisis where it lives, armed only with nasal swabs, educational materials, and personal protective equipment.  They’re able to pay for those necessities because this week they successfully raised more than $100,000 on GoFundMe.  Money for lifesaving medical treatment during a pandemic is coming not from government coffers but from the whims and wallets of the internet.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found that several racial minority groups account for a disproportionate number of the Covid-19 cases and fatalities in the United States, but the black community in particular is suffering.  In Wisconsin, a state that is only 6 percent black, black people account for about half of its Covid-19 deaths.  In Chicago, black people account for 70 percent of deaths due to Covid-19 but make up only 30 percent of its population.  In Richmond, Virginia, all but one of the people who have died of Covid-19 were black.  “I’ll tell you the first thing I said when I saw the disparities in fatality rates,” says Louis Penner, a professor emeritus at Wayne State University who studies racial disparities in health care.  “I said, ‘People are surprised?’”

Anybody who is paying attention knows that the gulf between the health statistics of white and black Americans has existed for decades, or, really, centuries.  Covid-19 is just the latest manifestation of an old and ugly trend.  The explanation for it is at once simple—racism—and incredibly complex.  Structural inequalities have kept black Americans significantly poorer than their white counterparts, and economic disparity creates health disparities, especially during a pandemic.  Black people (and other minority populations) tend to live in more polluted, more densely populated areas, have more people per household, and are overrepresented in settings where people are unable to effectively social distance, like prisons and homeless shelters.  They disproportionately work jobs currently considered essential, yet also are far less likely to have paid sick leave, enough savings to take time off, or a grocery store nearby enough to stock up easily.

Many of these factors, from living in food deserts to lacking health insurance, add up to mean that black communities also suffer at higher rates from acute and chronic medical conditions.  “My colleagues knew this was going to be an issue months ago, as soon as we started hearing that preexisting conditions like obesity, diabetes, chronic pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases are all risk factors for dying of Covid-19,” Penner says.
On top of creating the black community’s ongoing health crisis, systemic racism is also a barrier to treatment.  According to Shervin Assari, a health inequality researcher at Charles R.  Drew University, one of the only historically black medical schools in the nation, while white people prefer to get their health information from medical providers and the media, black people rate health-related information they receive from family members and churches more highly.  The reason for this isn’t poor education (although it’s another structurally unequal factor), it’s due to longstanding and justified mistrust.  “We found that racial prejudice amongst physicians affects how they interact with black patients,” Penner says.  “Even in very short, highly structured interactions between physicians and patients, black patients pick up on this and react to it. ”
Black patients tend to get poorer care and have worse health outcomes than white patients with the exact same illnesses, so it's little wonder that some struggle to put much stock in medical advice now.  “You do not necessarily follow what the system which has been oppressive is asking of you,” Assari says.  “If you do, you are ‘acting white,’ which there is some stigma around. ” In fact, according to Stuart Grande, a medical sociologist at the University of Minnesota, patients tend to do better when matched with a physician whose race matches their own.  It’s not a matter of some ghoulish white physicians deliberately underserving their black patients, it’s the subtler things: finding the patients’ symptoms credible, pursuing more aggressive forms of treatment, and the patient’s willingness to trust in and carry out a doctor’s recommendations.  That’s why efforts like Ala Stanford’s, bringing black doctors to care for the black community, are so valuable.

The cause of health disparities—past and present—are too layered and old to solve easily.  According to Penner, they’ve existed since Reconstruction, right when black health was no longer a matter of profit.  “The elimination of health disparities requires multilevel solutions across almost all of the institutions in the United States,” Assari says.  “In a short time, like four months in response to Covid-19, it is almost impossible to prevent a major racial gap.  It is extremely sad. ” Many, including National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases director Anthony Fauci, have said there is little that can be done now about the “unacceptable” disparity apart from providing all patients with the best standard of care.  Still, some officials, like New York governor Andrew Cuomo, have committed to ramping up testing in minority communities hit hard by the virus, and Stanford’s isn’t the only group working to get Covid-19 testing and educational outreach where it's needed most.  Penner says improving the financial well-being of these communities would also provide fast help.  “You’re not going to suddenly improve educational opportunities,” he says.  “There is no easier short solution than improving socioeconomic status. ”
The long-term solution is, of course, to dismantle structural inequalities, which may well take too long for anyone alive today to see the benefits.  Fortunately, technology-based interim solutions may help improve outcomes for individuals, if not totally erode the barriers to health equity.  “If there was one thing that could be done immediately, it’s for every hospital to do internal audits to make sure everyone is getting the same quality of care,” Penner says.  “They have the data, they ask about race, they ask about income.  Is the will there? I don’t know. ” Grande envisions leveraging telemedicine and creating apps in partnership with the black community.  “Clinicians are too damn busy to go back to school to learn how to be better,” Grande says.  “If we can intervene with an app or some sort of electronic record, we could cut through the bullshit: overcome access challenges, money availability, lack of trust. ” Technological interventions could, in the future, allow doctors to not only ensure that all patients are receiving the same standard of care, but that they’re receiving it in a way that suits their economic needs and communication preferences.

All the sources WIRED spoke with agree that no matter what is done now, minority groups—particularly black and Latinx communities—are still going to suffer higher rates of illness and death due to Covid-19.  It is unacceptable, but it is real.  “We need to move past disparities as a topic of interest and move towards action,” Grande says.  “Covid is highlighting major, major gaps in the current health care system and exacerbating issues we’ve known have existed for generations, but now we’re seeing them play out in immediate, tangible ways.  There’s a lot of work to be done, and I’m really hopeful. ” The Covid-19 pandemic has made more people aware of one of the ugliest aspects of inequality in America; hopefully it will motivate change for the better.  If not, the next time there’s a health crisis primarily weathered by America’s most vulnerable communities, nobody gets to be surprised.


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